Fleas & Ticks

STOP THE FLEA LIFECYCLE

Eggs: Every day, female fleas lay a huge number of eggs (40 to 50) that drop from your
pet onto the floor and furnishings. In 1 to 10 days, they hatch, and 25% to 30% develop
into adult fleas.

Larvae: Thriving in warm, humid conditions, larvae hide deep in rugs, furniture, and
between floorboards. They feed on adult flea droppings and other animal debris that
drops from dogs and cats.

Pupae: Growing into adults inside little cocoons, pupae can stay inactive for long periods unaffected by temperature, drying, and insecticides, and will surface in response to heat, CO2, and movement.

Adult: Within 5 minutes, they start feeding. Females can consume 15 times their body weight in blood. They mate 4 to 48 hours after feeding and prefer to remain on host animal for life.

LEARN ABOUT EACH STAGE OF THE LIFECYCLE

Flea infestations in your home are something you never want once, let alone twice! You need to break the flea lifecycle permanently, to ensure a successful riddance of fleas.

It’s a scary thought that for every flea on your dog or cat, there may be at least nine more in your home. Adult fleas lay eggs which hatch into larvae and spread to carpets, between floorboards, in furniture, and in bedding (yours and your pets).

Just when you thought the coast was clear, it’s not uncommon to find a new family reinfesting your home days to weeks after your pet was treated. This can be caused by a change in temperature (turning up the central heating).

To break the flea lifecycle, consider using a flea treatment that offers extended protection. This not only kills all fleas at all stages in your pet’s direct surroundings, but also ensures that newly-hatched adult fleas that may have jumped onto your pet won’t live long. There are many products available, including those that offer protection beyond 1 month.

The most effective way to get rid of fleas is to treat ALL your pets at once. Your veterinarian can recommend the best flea control products for all the animals in your home.

ASK US HOW TO BREAK THE FLEA LIFECYCLE WITH THE RIGHT TREATMENT!

REFERENCES

  1. Blagburn BL, Dryden MW. Biology, treatment, and control of flea and tick infestations. Vet Clin N Am Small Anim. 2009;39(6):1173-1200.
  2. Dryden M, Rust M. The cat flea: biology, ecology and control. Vet Parasitol. 1994;52(1-2):1-19.

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